History of the Town of Butler, Part 2

BY Prof. W.H. McIntosh, 1877




SOUTH BUTLER

This village is of modern growth. Early in 1839, O.H. Wheeler and his brother-in-law, S.B. Tucker, Esq., commenced, and soon completed, the erection of a steam saw-mill at the "corners." This mill still continues to do a large business. Prior to this time the locality was known as Harrington's Corners. An old log house and a dilapidated barn in the corner of a small clearing constituted the place. Some years prior to this, a man named Shedd had brought in some goods and opened a sort of store in a small house a mile west of the corners. It was at the place owned by Edward Bivin, who established a tannery there, but neither were of long continuance. At a much earlier day, probably about 1829, Ransom Ward had opened a small country store in a framed building, yet standing in connection with an adjoining one later built.

This was a half-mile west of West Butler, and was the first attempt of the kind in the town. It lacked support, and was shortly discontinued. The nearest trading-place was Wolcott. It was eight miles to Clyde, or six to Wolcott. Ornan King established a store at the corners, and gave the place his name. A post-office; bearing the name of South Butler, was soon after established here, and Dr. Clarendon Campbell was appointed postmaster. King was succeeded in business by Samuel C. and Sylvester Pomeroy. The former became United States Senator in the Congress of 1862. Sylvester was succeeded by Henry K. Graves. South Butler began to grow. It had more than a name. A hotel was erected and opened. One church after another was built, until four were supplied. Another store was opened, then a tannery and an ashery. A steam planing-mill was constructed and put into operation. Mechanics' shops sprang up, and residences succeeded until a pleasant village has grown up in this locality. It has three schools and about five hundred inhabitants. West Butler and Butler Centre are centres of population in the town. The first local minister was Caleb Mills. Rev. Antoinette L. Brown, the first woman regularly ordained in the State, was settled for several years over the Congregational church at South Butler.

THE BAPTIST CHURCH

Was the first religious organization in the town. That was established as early as 1824, and in 1825 Luther Goodrich was formally ordained by a council from "Cayuga Association," and installed as pastor of the church. In 1829-30 he was succeeded by Rev. Isaac D. Hosford. The church, which had a statutory organization under the name of THE SOUTH BUTLER AND SAVANNAH BAPTIST CHURCH, Was constituted June 26, 1834, --Elder Rowell Osborne, presiding officer, and J.W. Sawyer, clerk. There were present from Mentz church four members, from Clyde five, and from Butler three. Elder Hosford was the first pastor, and Ames Winegar the first clerk. Among those known as original members appear the names of Jeremiah Peck, Deacon Orange Gardner, and Hannah Winegar. The numbers at organization were about fifteen, -increased to one hundred and thirty at present. The first church building was erected in 1850; in size, thiry-three by forty-six feet; its cost, one thousand two hundred dollars. Services prior to its use were held in the school-house at South Butler, and in the one two miles east. The ministers have been Elders Osborne, Dusenbery, Needham, A.S. Curtis, J.H. Moore, N. Ferguson, Patterson (a supply), J.S. Everingham, who remained seven and one-half years, R.S. Dean, three years, W.C. Phillips, B.F. Mace, and A.H. Stearns, the present pastor.

The first Sabbath-school was organized about 1850. The present officers are J.H. Stearns, superintendent; Spencer Hall, secretary; Joel Bishop, librarian. There are nine teachers, eighty pupils, and a creditable library.

THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

There was a Presbyterian church organized under the auspices of the presbytery of Geneva in 1831, and in 1836 a church edifice was erected (the first one in the town) at South Butler. The pulpit was "supplied" by Rev. Wm. Clark and ___ Gelson, and by members of the senior class in Auburn Theological Seminary, and others, for several years.

In 1841, the church withdrew from the presbytery, its leading members becoming more "liberal", and desiring congregationalism. It then proceeded formally to require of its members "total abstinence from intoxicating drinks;" and in 1842 it resolved that "with slaveholders and apologists of slavery" it would hold no fellowship.

Samuel R. Ward, a colored man, preached there about two years, in 1841-43. In 1845-46, Lewis C. Lockwood and James Gregg; and in 1853, Antoinette L. Brown. She was "installed" as pastor of the church (authority by any one to "ordain" being disclaimed and denied) by a speech from Gerritt Smith. Thence the organization languished, and, as several of the members joined the Presbyterian church at Savannah, finally ceased to exist.

BUTLER CENTRE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH

The Methodist Episcopal church of Butler, according to the records, must have been erected in 1836, and belonged to the Rose circuit. The first quarterly meeting was held, in the Methodist chapel, Butler Centre, December 3, 1836. Present - Isaac Stone, presiding elder; Burrow Holmes, preacher in charge; and Joseph Byron, assistant; John Roe, secretary; Thomas Roberts and Daniel Smith, local preachers; Austin Roe and Francis R. Nichols, exhorters. Class-leaders as follows, viz: M. Smith, Paul H. Davis, James Cosgrove, William Wadsworth, Thomas West, Russell Rusco, Thaddeus Collins, Benjamin Jenkins, Joel H. Lee, James Park, Amos Aldrich.

The following are among the pastors of this church, viz: Anson Tuller, Benjamin Rider, Isaac Hall, Rowland Soule, Moses Lyon, George G. Hupgood, Royal Houghton, Samuel B. Crozier, D.B. Smith, D. Ferguson, S. Nichols, and Orin Switzer, present pastor.

Present membership, one hundred and thirty; average attendance, one hundred and fifty; seating capacity, two hundred; salary, eight hundred dollars, including use of parsonage and donation; six-hundred dollars regular salary.

THE DISCIPLES CHURCH OF SOUTH BUTLER

Some forty-eight to fifty years ago, the paper edited by Alexander Campbell, of Bethany, Virginia, known as the Christian-Baptist, found its way into the hands of a few of the Baptist members in the vicinity, and the leaven commenced working, and in a short time they were declared heretics, and cast out of the fold. So the excluded members formed a society for mutual improvement, taking the Bible alone as the rule of faith and practice. This nucleus consisted of seven members, viz: John Dratt and wife, Lyman Hill and his sister, Mrs. Chapin, Israel J. Clapp and wife, and a Mr. Comstock. Brother Dratt was the elder. The meetings were held for some time in the school-houses of the immediate neighborhoods.

This church, first designated "Campbellite," then "Disciples," and later "Christian," was instituted about the year 1831.

They denied Sciptural authority for ordaining or setting apart any one as a minister or preacher, or as specially authorized to administer the rites of the church, such as baptism and the Lord's Supper; and maintained that a hired ministry and the "paying for preaching" was wrong. This dogma was therefore practiced upon; some one of the members, any one who saw fit, assumed to preach, to distribute the bread and wine (which is done every Sunday), and to baptize (i.e. immerse) such as "believe", and desire the ceremony. Latterly, however, a majority of them have so far receded as to deem it politic to have a regular preacher.

The first meeting-house was a plain structure, thiry-five by forty feet, and was built some thirty-five or thirty-six years since, at a cost of about eight hundred dollars. The great increase in the membership rendered this edifice inadequate for the wants of the society; therefore the congregation resolved to build a new church edifice, which they accordingly did in 1861. The building is a substantial structure, sixty by forty-two feet, and cost about three thousand dollars.

Present officers: Elders, Henry K. Graves, Prentice Cushman, and William Fowler; the minister's name, O.C. Atwater. The first minister located was Josiah I. Lowell, who remained with the church until he died, in the year 1858.

The number of present members is about three hundred, being the next largest, if not largest, society of Disciples in the State.

The first Sunday-school was organized by Dr. M.F. Sweeting, in the "old church," about the year 1853 or 1854. The first superintendent was Dr. M. F. Sweeting, with a corps of five teachers and perhaps fifty pupils.

The names of present officers are: Superintendent, Dr. M.F. Sweeting; Assistant Superintendent, O.C. Atwater; Librarian, Veler Mead; Assistants, Julian Crow and Charles E. Sweeting; Accountant, Azel Hough; Chorister, Celia Pomeroy; Organist, Hattie Hamilton, and a corps of twenty-four teachers and about three hundred pupils.

The library consists of about six hundred volumes. The peculiar characteristic of this people is, they contend earnestly for the Bible, and the Bible only, as their rule of faith and practice.

ADVENTS

The Second Advents organized a society in South Butler in the year 1861, and purchased the old church edifice of the Disciples, after that society built their new house in the same year. At this time the society was in quite a flourishing condition, and continued so for a few years; but latterly the numbers are small, and at present they do not try to sustain a preacher, nor have meetings often.


SOLDIERS' RECORD FOR BUTLER

Angus, George F.
Angus, Elijah, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted April, 1864; discharged 1865.
Armstrong, Thomas, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted December, 1864; discharged 1865.
Angus, Gilbert T., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted April, 1862; discharged 1865.
Ambrose, Leonard, 96th Infantry. Enlisted April, 1865; discharged 1865.
Benjamin, Henry, 96th Infantry. Enlisted August, 1864; discharged 1865.
Bell, George A., 193d Infantry. Enlisted February, 1865; discharged 1865.
Brown, Robert C., 96th Infantry. Enlisted April, 1865; discharged 1865.
Bell, William H., 75th Infantry. Enlisted March, 1865; discharged 1865.
Blackman, Jasper, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted August, 1864; discharged 1865.
Beebe, Barney, Company A, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Braymer, Josiah, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Blackman, Jasper 3d Artillery. Enlisted September, 1862.
Calkins, M., 95th Infantry. Enlisted April, 1865; discharged 1865.
Calkins, Hudson, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted August, 1864; discharged 1865.
Cunningham, P.
Calkins, Warren, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862; discharged 1865.
Calkins, John, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862; discharged 1865.
Calkins, Allen, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862; discharged 1865.
Conklin, Benjamin, 50th Engineers; Enlisted August, 1864; discharged 1865.
Crane, Myron, 96th Infantry. Enlisted April, 1864; Discharged 1865. [died 1865]
Cornell, A., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted December, 1863; discharged 1865.
Cornell, William W., 27th Infantry. Enlisted March, 1865; discharged 1865.
Crow, Lafayette, 111th Infantry. Enlisted January, 1864; killed October 19, 1864.
Crow, Morris J., 111th Infantry. Enlisted January, 1864; died or killed.
Calvin, Sidney.
Campbell, R.M., lieutenant, Company A, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Curtis, Albert F., corporal; Company B, 111th Infantry, 2d corps. Enlisted September, 1862.
Crawford, Myron H., Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Calkins, Ezra H., Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Clapp, Cassius M., Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Colvin, S.T., Company H, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Conklin, Theodore, 3d Artillery. Enlisted September, 1862.
Drewry, Benjamin (2d), 111th Infantry. Enlisted August, 1864; discharged 1865.
Devoe, John H., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted September, 1862; discharged 1865.
Dusenbery, C.J., sergeant, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted September, 1862; discharged 1865.
Downs, Charles, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Dunbar, D., Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Dean, T.S., Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Devoe, Henry, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Dean, Jonathan, 160th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Elby, James, 15th Infantry. Enlisted July, 1864; discharged 1865.
Fitch, Cyrus, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted September, 1862; discharged 1865.
Fitch, George H., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted January, 1864. discharged 1865.
Fowler, M.F., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted September, 1862; discharged 1865.
Fitch, Allen W., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted January, 1864; discharged 1865.
Fitch, Irving L., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted January 1864; died or killed.
Foster, C.M., 75th Infantry. Enlisted March, 1864; died or killed.
Fowler, George, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Fowler, F.M., Company H, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Foster, Lewis, 160th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Grant, James W., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted January, 1864; discharged 1865.
Grant, Clark, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted January, 1864; discharged 1865.
Grant, J.W., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted January, 1864; discharged 1865.
Green, George.
Green, Charles, Company A, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Grant, Isaac W., Company G. 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Grandy, Lewis D., Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Grandy, William, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Holdridge, Ambrose, 50th Engineers. Enlisted August, 1864; discharged 1865.
Hoyt, Oscar, 15th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1864; discharged 1865.
Hoyt, Evelyn W., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted August, 1862; discharged 1865; re-enlisted.
Hanes, William, 15th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1864; discharged 1865.
Haywood, Elbert, 50th Engineers. Enlisted August, 1864; died or killed.
Huffman, Franklin, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Huffman, Edmund, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Hale, James, Company C, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Jackson, Andrew, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Kellogg, William B., Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Kellogg, Ethan, Company H, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Loveless, James, 75th Infantry. Enlisted June, 1864; discharged 1865.
Loveless, Hamilton, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted March, 1863; died 1864.
Loveless, George, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Lutes, Jacob, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Mathews, William H., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted September, 1862; discharged 1865.
Moore, Calvin B., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted September, 1862; discharged 1865.
Marcellus, Lewis, Company A, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Marshall, William M., Company A, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Merrill, Edgar J., Company A, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Murray, Patrick, Company A, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Marsh, Cornelius, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Mead, Dwight, 160th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
McIntyre, Henry F., 160th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Nichols, Jesse, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted September, 1864; died or killed.
Overocken, George, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted January, 1864; discharged 1865.
Olmsted, Ira L., 96th Infantry. Enlisted April, 1865; discharged.
Pierson, F.R., 96th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862; discharged 1865.
Phelps, John, 96th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862; discharged 1865.
Phelps, Virgil, 96th Infantry. Enlisted August, 1863; discharged 1865.
Palmer, Giles G., 95th Infantry. Enlisted April, 1865; discharged 1865.
Perkins, George, 111th Infantry. Enlisted February, 1864; discharged 1865.
Pritchard, Chester B., 75th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1861; died or killed.
Perry, Jeff. T., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted August, 1862; died or killed.
Perkins, Charles, 111th Infantry. Enlisted July, 1864; died or killed.
Pritchard, John, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Post, Daniel, 160th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Rawson, Edward, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted December, 1863; discharged 1865.
Robinson, George, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted April, 1864; discharged 1865.
Rand, Willard. Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Shepard, Edward, 97th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1863; discharged 1865.
Southwick, Warren, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted August, 1862; discharged 1865.
Sherman, James, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862; discharged 1865.
Sweeting, V.H. 111th Infantry. Enlisted February, 1864; discharged 1865.
Seamans, James M., 75th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1861; died or killed.
Sherman, William, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1863; died or killed.
Sherman, W.H., Company C, 111th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Sprague, Alfred J., Company A, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Sprague, Lewis, Company A, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Silliman, Hiram, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Scott, Artemus G., Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Smith, Lewis, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Sherman W.B., Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Southwick, Allen, Company C, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Southwick, Benjamin, Company C, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Stetsel, John, 160th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Sherman, Henry, 111th Infantry.
Tillon, Wilhelmus, Company G, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Tompkins, Henry, Company H, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Thompson, John, 160th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Upham, David, 50th Engineers. Enlisted August, 1864; discharged 1865.
Underhill, Jason, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted September, 1863; discharged 1865.
Van Antwerp, J., Company G., 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Walker, Thomas, 96th Infantry. Enlisted April, 1865; discharged 1865.
Westcott, John W., 96th Infantry. Enlisted May, 1865; discharged 1865.
Wendover [?copy smudged], George, 75th Infantry. discharged 1865.
Wendover, James, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted August, 1862; discharged 1865.
Wood, William, captain, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862; promoted; discharged 1865.
Wisner, James, 50th Engineers; Enlisted August, 1864;discharged 1865.
Wendover, William, 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted Jan., 1864; transferred; discharged 1865.
Wheeler, H.H., 9th Heavy Artillery. Enlisted Jan., 1864; pro. to 2d lieut; discharged 1865.
Watson, Elisha, 138th Infantry. Enlisted August, 1862; discharged 1865.
Walker, James W., Company A, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Wilson, Israel S., Company A, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Warren, C.M., Company H, 138th Infantry. Enlisted September, 1862.
Wiley, Henry, 3d Heavy Artillery. Enlisted September, 1862.


BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

NATHANIEL W. TOMPKINS

In the settlement of a new country no attributes were more essential in the pioneers than that of force of character, energy, and enterprise characteristic of the sons of New England. No class of persons that reared their homes in the "Genesee Country" were better adapted to face the obstacles incident to pioneer life than the native born sons of the grand old commonwealth of Connecticut.

Prominent among those who selected the fertile lands of the Senecas for their future home was the subject of this notice, who was born in Waterbury, Connecticut, October 27, 1799. His boyhood was passed in Oneida county, whither he had moved with his parents when but two years of age. In 1832 he came to Wayne County, and engaged in the mercantile business in the village of Wolcott. Here he conducted a successful business until 1841, when he retired from mercantile operations, and located upon a farm in the town of Butler, where he has since resided. Upon settling in this town, he was elected supervisor in 1842, and served two terms. He was postmaster at Wolcott a number of years. While a resident of Wolcott he purchased the grist-and saw-mills in 1835, and managed them until he removed to Butler. Upon the organization of the Republican party he became a member, and is an earnest supporter of the principles of that organization. His parents, Eleazer Tompkins and Hannah Hickox, were also natives of Connecticut.

October 29, 1821, Mr. Tompkins united in marriage with Bethiah Hubbard, a native of Oneida county, New York, by whom he had four children, two sons and two daughters, all deceased, save Bethiah H., wife of James H. White, residing at Fort Huron, Michigan. She was born in 1838, and united in marriage with Mr. White in 1869. The other children were as follows, viz.: Gilbert H., born in Paris, New York, January 15, 1823. He was a prominent merchant of New York, and died April 14, 1863. Charlotte H., born in 1826, married James H. White, died in 1861. Orestes H. died in infancy. In 1862 Mr. Tompkins married Jane Porter Wilson, a native of Ireland, born November 11, 1828. Their family consisted of three children, two of whom, James W. and an infant, are deceased. William I., their remaining child, is a bright lad, and will no doubt be a source of great comfort to their declining years.


COLUMBUS LOVELESS

Son of Ransom and Mary Loveless, is a native of Butler, born May 10, 1822. In common with many of the successful men of this day, the only advantages of education offered him was the district school of "Auld Lang Syne." He, however, improved every opportunity and succeeded in acquiring a good business education. His life has thus far been spent as a tiller of the soil, in which avocation he has met with eminent success. His broad acres of fine farming lands are suggestive of a life of toil, but clearly indicate that the father's example of energy, industry, and good management has been followed by the son, who has secured a competency of this world's goods. He is a Republican in politics, and a firm adherent to the party. In January, 1843, he married Prudence Aldrich, a native of Rose, Wayne County, New York, born in June, 1822, by whom he had six children, all residing in the town of Butler, viz., George, Jerome, Harrison, Mary, Ransom, and Columbus. Mrs. L. died in 1871. In June 1871, he united in marriage with Maria Campbell. As a citizen Mr. Loveless is honorable and upright; as a neighbor obliging, and as a parent kind and indulgent.


RANSOM LOVELESS, SEN.

Ransom Loveless, Sen., was born in Johnstown, Montgomery county, New York, February 16, 1791. The years of his boyhood were passed in that county, and at the age of sixteen he came to Onondaga county, where he remained until twenty-one years of age.

He early saw that energy and industry would eventually place him beyond want, and being possessed of a remarkable spirit of self-reliance, at the age of sixteen he purchased his time of his father - an occurrence common in those days - for sixty dollars, and engaging with a farmer at ten dollars per month, at the close of six months had canceled his debt. He stepped out into the broad arena of active life, and though young in years it required no prophetic vision to see that he was certain to become one of the substantial and wealthy men of the county.

At the age of twenty-one years he located at Nunda, Livingston county, New York, and subsequently settled in the town of Wolcott, near Butler. He came to this town in 1816, and was well qualified to buffet the hardships of pioneer life, and lived to see the town transformed from a rude state to one of the finest agricultural regions in the country. Mr. Loveless passed a laborious and active life, never for a moment flagging, but toiled on and on with his characteristic energy, and the result was that at the time of his death he was possessed of three hundred and fifty acres of valuable farm land in the town that he had entered nearly fifty years before.

He was a man of indomitable will, and whatever enterprise he turned his attention to he pursued with vigor and carried to a successful termination. In public matters he was active, always manifesting great interest in everything that tended to the public welfare. He was an active anti-Mason, and bore a conspicuous part in his town in the anti-Masonic campaign. He subsequently became a Whig, and finally a Republican.

He married Mary Hodges, who was born in Brutus, New York, November 7, 1795. She was a member of the Protestant Methodist church at Wolcott at the time of her death, which occurred May 22, 1874. Mr Loveless died August 1, 1864.


RANSOM LOVELESS, JUN.

Was born in Wolcott, February 28, 1818. He early manifested a desire for a liberal education, and entering Red Creek Academy, pursued his studies with diligence, and completed his education at the celebrated Oneida Conference Seminary at Cazenovia, New York. He returned to his native town and commenced the tilling of the soil, and has since resided within sixty feet of where he first saw the light of day. He inherited in a great degree the characteristics of his father, and has accumulated a large property. August 17, 1845, he married Jane M. Lamoreax, a native of Putnam county, New York, born October 14, 1818. Mr. Loveless is a consistent Christian, and a member of the Baptist church at South Butler. Politically he is a Republican, and an earnest supporter of the principles of that party. He justly merits his success in life, as well as the reputation of being one of the prominent and substantial citizens of the county.


CHARLES W. SPRAGUE

Son of David and Violetta Sprague, was born in Butler, Wayne County, New York, in 1836. In 1866 he united in marriage with Mary Davis, who was born in Onondaga county, in 1846. Kind Providence has blessed this union with two children, viz., Josie E., born in 1867, and Geo. D., born in 1872. Mr. Sprague was early taught that energy, industry, and frugality were the necessary essentials of success in life, and that he has been energetic, industrious, and frugal is evidenced by his fine farm and residence. Though young in years, he has already succeeded in acquiring a competency of this world's goods, and is surrounded by all the attributes of a happy rural home. He is a practical agriculturist, and is ranked among the leading farmers of the county. He is Republican in politics.

David Sprague, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Hoosick, New York, in 1785. He was twice married, first to Jane Tyler, and afterwards to Violetta Johnson. His family, by the first wife, consisted of fifteen children, only one living, and six by the second wife, all living. He was a member of the Baptist church and of the Republican party.

James Davis, the father of Mrs. Chas. W. Sprague, was born at Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, South Wales, May 6, 1821. June 1, 1841, he bade adieu to his native land, determined to seek a home across the water. He arrived in New York July 13 of the same year. He located at Cardiff, where he united in marriage with Anna Beare, who was born February 7, 1822, at Appledore, Devonshire, England. Upon landing in this country he commenced business as a tailor, and subsequently engaged in the same business in Jordan and South Butler, where he now resides.


DANIEL ROGERS

The subject of this sketch, a lineal descendant of the martyr John Rogers, was born August 28, 1806, at Windham, Greene county, New York, where he passed his boyhood days. When twelve years of age he went to Durham, in the same county, and worked on the farm of William Moore until he was twenty-one. On attaining his majority he had only a meagre supply of home-made clothes, for the one hundred dollars due him for services he did not receive until some ten years afterward. He immediately moved to Troy, Rensselaer county, where for two years he engaged in draying in the employ of Smith & Start. He then purchased Mr. Start's interest and embarked in business for himself, which he continued for twenty years, carting about the city in summer, and in the winter, after navigation was closed, teaming to New York and Boston, employing twenty horses and a dozen dray-carts.

In 1846, Mr. Rogers removed from Troy to Butler, Wayne County, his present residence. Ever since locating in this county he has been engaged in farming. In politics he is Republican.

He was married October 7, 1829, to Anna Lake, a native of Greenville, Greene county, New York. They have had eight children, viz., James Henry (deceased), George Lewis, John Alfred, (deceased), Charles Barton (deceased), Martha Jane, (deceased) Ann Eliza, (deceased) Sara Francis and Elisha. George L. resides at Catskill, Greene county, New York, Sarah F. at Victory, Cayuga county, New York, and Elisha in Butler, this county.

In this connection we record a gathering of the Rogers family at North Cornwall, Connecticut, on the Noah Rogers farm, September 28, 1864. One hundred and twenty members were present from half a dozen different States, assembled around three long tables beneath an ample tent, and presided over by Daniel L. Rogers, of Cornwall. Ambrose S. Rogers, of New Milford, Connecticut, in an able address, delineated with clearness the lineal descent of the gathered family from the Christian martyr, John Rogers. A grandson of the martyr, Thomas Rogers, and one of his family, came over in the "Mayflower" in 1620, but Thomas died during that first dread winter, and the next year the rest of his family came over, and after some twenty-five years' residence in Plymouth Colony, moved westward, bearing Governor Bradford's permit, settling at Huntington, Long Island. One of this family, John Rogers, was the father of Noah Rogers, the great-great-grandfather of Noah Rogers, a young man of twenty, residing on the farm where the reunion was held. The present generation is the ninth from the martyr. Without attempting to give the details of the proceedings, we give a few extracts from the address before referred to:

"John Rogers was burnt at the stake at Smithfield, yet his name is but the more esteemed, his virtues but shine the brighter, and his sterling principles are all the better appreciated. The day that witnessed the martyrdom of that distinguished divine was a very melancholy one to his family, but a glorious one to his posterity and the world. We all abhor the bloody and persecuting reign of Mary, and her barbarous deeds; yet out of the darkness of that hour arose a light that neither the dungeon, the gibbet, nor the stake could conquer, but has sent its radiating beams to the farthermost parts of the earth. He was prebendary [a clergyman] divinity lecturer at Saint Paul's when Mary ascended the throne. He soon rendered himself obnoxious to her, and in her zeal for popery she caused his arrest; after lying in Newgate prison, and passing through three examinations, he was finally condemned to be burnt at the stake,- a sentence which was carried into execution February 4, 1555."




Volunteer typist: Leola Crane Sutton




Source of the above article: Everts, Ensign, & Everts. 1877. History of Wayne County, NY, 1789-1877. Press of J. B. Lippencott & Co. Philadelphia, PA. Reproduced 1975. Professor W. H. McIntosh. Dendron Press. Yankee Peddler Bookshop. Pultneyville, NY.

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Created: 4/3/00
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